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managed to deliver several tons of food rations to the somali capital, mogadishu. that is not a task without major risks. >> african union peacekeepers face off against militants in mogadishu on thursday. the two sides exchanged heavy gunfire, leaving several insurgents dead. the au says the offensive aimed at getting supplies to those in need. a militia had barred eight agent -- agencies from operating in regions of the country under their control. that means even more somalis are going hungry. tens of thousands have fled to the capital to escape the drought. many more continue to cross each kenya -- east kenya in hopes of reaching the camp complex. >> i spent 17 days on the road with my 12 children. thank god we made it. i have just been given a tent by an organization here. >> additional emergency shelters are being set up around the main facilities. the main camps are terribly overcrowded. the kenyan government finally yielded to international pressure and opened a third can -- camp. kenyans have also fled to the camps. some city government in nairobi could do more. >> [inaudible
the crisis that for 18 months has threatened a single currency? >> fayed will be airlifted into mogadishu within days, according to the united nations. over 3.5 million people, almost half of the somali population are facing severe food shortages. here are reports from mogadishu, one of the world's most dangerous places. >> to move in mogadishu, you need men's with -- men with guns. and plenty of them. it the burundian peacekeepers got ready to drive me to the outskirts of the capital. it in heavily armored vehicles, we passed through the government controlled areas where despite the war, business is still booming. but the landscape is changing. almost every open space we passed was filled with makeshift shelters. the homes for those fleeing the drought and the threat of widespread famine. despite only being 400 meters from the front line, thousands are still pouring into this camp. setting of with the few possessions they have managed to bring with them. [navy crane -- baby crying] mothers hugh, desperate to get help for their severely malnourished -- mother's line of, desperate to get
camp. >>> meanwhile, heavy fighting was reported in somalia's capital of mogadishu as the african peacekeepers launched an offensive to help with the famine relief efforts to be thwarted by al qaeda rebels. six people were killed. joining us from skype from mogadishu is richard guerra from the united association of human rights. and what can you tell us about the fighting and the ripple effects of the already existing problems there? >> well, hello, and good evening from me at least. well, for the time being, we have not seen much of the effect of the new fighting. we are hoping that it won't affect too much of the operation here, and i would not create additional movement. i will have to say that the fightings have been happening in another part of the city where we have less likely been located. >> richard, tell us about the u.n. efforts taking place in somalia and one of the first planeloads of relief supplies were airlifted in yesterday? is that correct? >> well, that is correct. that is the first visible increase of aid coming here in mogadishu, and we are scaling up the acti
-held areas and heading for the capital. >> children are the first victims affected by famine. in mogadishu, aid workers tried their best to save lives every day. one refugee from southern somalia said she is looking for help from the outside world. she says the drought has taken everything they have and the children are close to dying. the suffering is appalling. refugees seeking shelter in the devastated capital, mogadishu. for many, it is their best hope. at least here, there is some degree of assistance. most of the city is under the control of the pro-western federal government, supported by african user peacekeepers. it is dangerous for everyone, including international aid organizations. few foreigners risk of entering into the city. those who do rely on the armed escorts. when representatives pay a visit to refugee camps, -- when you and representatives pay a visit to representative q g camps -- when u.n . representatives visit refugee camps, they come into the armored transports. >> we are trying to reach those in the epicenter of the famine conditions in southern, -- southern soma
, mogadishu, within a matter of days. will ross reports from mogadishu, one of the world's most dangerous places. >> to move in mogadishu, you need men with guns and plenty of them. but burundi peacekeepers got ready to drive me to the outskirts of this battered capital. its heavily armored vehicles would pass through the government-controlled areas where, despite the war, business is still booming. but the landscape is changing. almost every open space we passed was filled with make-shift shelters. the homes for those fleeing the drought and the threat of wide spread famine. despite only being 400 meters from the front line, thousands are still pouring into this camp. setting up with the few possessions they've managed to bring with them. the real depth of this crisis only becomes clear once we reach the clinic. mothers queue, desperate to get help for their severely malnourished children. when this baby had absolutely no food or water in her village in the famine-hit south, she caught a ride to mogadishu on the back of a lori with her five children. her son doesn't look it, but she's 12
around the world today. the first flight of the world food program into the somali capital of mogadishu is due to be under way in a day or so after calls for international effort to get aid to millions across the horn of africa. the un refugee agency says 40,000 people have flooded into mogadishu in search of food and water over the past month. many other somalis have fled to kenya and ethiopia. we can now speak to caroline, the spokesperson for the world food program. she joins us now. thank you very much for being with us. is any significant progress being made? >> yes. as soon as the airlift gets off the ground, it will be the first significant food to be brought into the country since the crisis was declared a famine last week. of course, it's all about scaling up the food for those people that are streaming into mogadishu from other areas of south somalia, as you rightly said. basically, we are running our operations there because it's a number one global priority for us. it's a matter of life and death. >> it is a matter of life and death. are you anywhere near that figure the u.n
washington. let's cross over for an update on the situation in somalia. >> 8 will be airlifted into mogadishu within days according to the u.n. as famine grips east african -- grips east africa. we report from mogadishu. >> to move in mogadishu, you need men with guns. the peacekeepers are ready to drive me to the outskirts of this capital. in heavily armored vehicles, we pass through the government controlled areas. despite the war, business is booming. the landscape is changing into every open space. the homes for those fleeing the drought and widespread famine. despite only being 400 meters from the front line, thousands are still pouring into this camp. they are setting up with a few possessions they have managed to bring with them. the real debt of this crisis on the becomes clear once we reached the clinic. mothers get in line, desperate to get help for their severely malnourished children. when sophia had absolutely no food or village, she caught a ride to mogadishu on the back of a lorry with her five children. her son does not look it but he is 12 months old and already in a struggle
. >> a pleasure. >> if in somalia, an effort to airlift emergency supplies into mogadishu is underway. today his mission is the first of 10 being carried out by the world food program in response to severe droughts, which are ravaging the horn of africa. they are being transferred to mogadishu from kenya to feed malnourished children. our correspondent has this report. >> the cargo, and 10 tons for severely malnourished children. this their feuded pace is a lifesaver. it is a race against time -- this at nutritional paste is an lifesaver. these times will be going into mogadishu, where it will be distributed for malnourished children. the world food program says the first airlift will feed 3.5000 children for the next month, but given the scale of the problem in somalia, it is just a drop in the ocean. the drought has hit so hard, in parts of the south, over one- third of all children are malnourished. aid agencies say there is a danger that disease could break out. in somalia, almost half of the entire population urgently needs food aid. rations have been cut in recent months. now, there is a m
no functioning government in mogadishu and effectively ruled the entire country. this lack of governance have resulted in somalia being engaged in a chaotic civil war that has embedded the growth of islamic fundamentalism and piracy. you managing, pluto and security conditions continue to deteriorate across south-central somalia. in the past two years more than 22000 civilians have been killed, and estimate 1.1 when people displaced, and at least 476,000 somalis have fled to neighboring countries. somalia is currently experience in what is considered the worst drought in the horn of africa since the 1950s. as a result of this drought and the continuing conflict, nancy lindborg, assistant secretary of usaid bureau of democracy, conflict and humidity assistance will testify today that some to .85 million somalis are in need of humanitarian aid. mr. brigety, will testify that somalis comprise the largest refugee population in africa. that represents more than 750,000 people in the greater horn of africa region, 120,000 have arrived in refugee camps in the region since january of this year. in 20
in addressing the consequences of somalia have been no functioning government in mogadishu to effectively rule the entire country. this lack of government has resulted in somalia being engaged in the chaotic civil war. humanitarian, political, and security conditions continue to deteriorate across somalia. in the past two years, more than 22,000 civilians have been killed. an estimated 1.1 million people have been displaced. at least 476,000 simoleons -- somalis have fled to neighboring countries. they are experiencing what is considered the worst drought in the horn of africa since the 1950's. nancy lindborg, assistant secretary -- assistant administrator for u.s.a.i.d., will testify. deputy assistant secretary reuben brigety will testify. there are more than 750,000 people in the horn of africa -- going and africa region -- or about for the region. in 2003, the group was added to the list of terrorist organizations-- al shabab, whose primary objective was to establish a greater somalia under sharia. al shabab has increasingly controlled the country. the transitional federal government has lo
exclusive. david muir is the only american reporter on the scene in mogadishu as a gun battle breaks out. he's on the front lines in a fight to get food for the people who need it. >>> mystery solved. he's america's most elusive fugitive, d.b. cooper. he jump pd from a plane 40 years ago. do agents finally have their man? >>> good evening. david muir is on assignment tonight in africa. we're going to go to him in a moment. weweegin here in washington where this has been an extraordinary weekend of high wire, high stakes talks. here's that countdown clock again. two days before the government can no longer borrow the cast we need to pay america's bills. at this hour, the framework of the deal is in place. president obama has agreed to massive spending cuts in return for republican leaders and congress agreeing to raise the debt ceiling for the next election. the framework is fragile. there's no final signofof our entire team iss tracking a fluid situation. for the latest we begin with jon karl. jon, you broke the story of this framework late last night. this morning we were all told the leade
in the country's capital of mogadishu. there is a refugee camp where people have not eaten in days. now more from the camp as they wait for relief. >> reporter: in the center of mogadishu town, many here haven't eaten for days. barely surviving the trek up through the territory held by militants, they're desperate not to be left out. across mogadishu, camps like this are springing up. the new arrivals pitching their tents wherever they can. the world food program says that it is currently feeding 1.5 million people here in somalia. many of those here in this town have made that desperate trek up through south and central somalia through the areas held by the al shabab militant groups where aid can reach them. for those 1.5 million that aid is reaching, the world food program estimates there are further 2 million that agencies are unable to get to. the african union forces are fighting to secure the capital. they're trying to ensure that the militants, these people fled, cannot follow them into the safe havens. a job the deputy chairman of the au says his people are succeeding at. now he says it i
to deal with famine. cnn's nama is live in the capital city of mogadishu. you tell us, it seems to be just a litany of problems there. >> well, in addition to the natural disaster that people are living through, it t.j., what's exacerbating this issue is that in the areas held by the shabab militants, islamist militants, they're not allowing aid agencies in. you can imagine these people who desperately fled the violence that's been ratcheting through the capital mogadishu for two decades now, have actually now been so desperate that they're coming back into the capital and there are tens of thousands. this is the only place, really, that they are getting aid. we went along to one of those camps here in the center of mogadishu and managed to speak to some of those people, t.j. this district in the center of mogadishu town, many here haven't eaten for days. barely surviving the trek up through the territory held by militants, they're desperate not to be left out. across mogadishu camps like this are springing up. the new arrivals pitching their tents, wherever they can. the world food progra
into the capital mogadishu is underway, the first of 10 missions being carried out by the world food program in response to the severe drought which is ravaging the horn of africa. our correspondent reports. >> the carter, 10 tons of food for a severely nourished children in somalia -- the cargo. the therapeutic paste is a lifesaver. it is a race against time. >> within the next few days, i believe some of this will be going to mogadishu, where it will be distributed at feeding centers too malnourished children there. >> the world food program says the first airlift will feed 350,000 children over the next month, but given the scale in somalia, this is just a drop in the ocean -- will feed 3500. aid agencies say that with so many children in a precarious situation, there is a danger disease could break out. in somalia, almost half the population urgently needs of food aid. rations have been cut in recent months. now, there is a massive drive to increase the assistance. some say the u.n. is being too slow with the delivery of food. several are trying to access to areas held by the islamic ins
, mogadishu, is not safe. it is still a magnet for people in need. >> she is 80 years old and she is taking care of five children. she is the grandmother. the father and mother died because of disease. >> the hardline islamic group al-shabab has links to al qaeda and is fighting the western government of somalia. the government is in control of olli the center of the capital. is these areas where somalis are starving to death. al-shabab has made clear it will continue the activities -- to disrupt the activities of agencies. >> agencies we band before are still banned. some were involved in political activity. others were destroying the lives of our people and we had to ban them too. the last u.n. said -- a u.n. report says there is famine in somalia. we say this is 100% baseless and sheer propaganda. >> the u.n. and the international community face a mammoth challenge. >> it is very dangerous and risky, but we have to reach people. they are not making it all the way to mogadishu. these other ones lucky enough to make a year and these centers are overrun. >> in northeastern kenya, they need
of mogadishu is not safe, but still a magnet for people in need. >> she is 80 years old and is taking care of five children. she is the grandmother. the founder and mother died because of disease. -- the father and mother died because of disease. >> al-shabab, which has admitted to links with al qaeda, is fighting the government of somalia. they control some of the southern and central parts of the country. the government is in control of just the center of the capital. it seems that many are starving to death. the u.n. declared this week that a state of famine now exists. al-shabab said it will continue to control the activities of agencies. >> the agency's we band before are still banned. some of those were involved in political activity, others were destroying the lives of our people. we had to ban them, too. the biggest responsibility lies with the united nations. their report says there is famine in somalia. we say this is utter nonsense. it is sheer propaganda. >> to the u.n., the international community face is -- a mammoth challenge. >> it is very risky, but we have to reach people
are being transferred to my condition at -- mogadishu. >> the >> supervisor chu:, 10 tons of food for severely malnourished children in somalia. airlifting is expensive but it is a race against time. we will be bringing in a total of 100 tons within the next few days and i believe 80 will be going to mogadishu where it will be distributed at centers to malnourished children there. the world food program said the first airlift's will feed 3.5000 children but given the scale, this is a drop in the ocean. the drought has hit so hard, parts of the south, over one- third of children are severely malnourished. agencies say with some of the children in a precarious situation, there's a danger disease could break out. russians have been cut in recent months. there is a massive fund raisgra. the usomalians say the un have been too slow. delicate can to -- negotiations continue. the severe drought and food shortage were predicted last year. in somalia, people cannot wait for the aid to reach them. war and hunger are driving more than 1000 somalis into kenya into the refugee camps. the arduo
in mogadishu where hundreds are now fleeing back to the war torn city that they fled. >> reporter: horror reaches the streets of mogadishu. hunger. these people fled the war here and now they're back, desperate for food and water. huma's husband died of starvation, she said she travelled 400 kilometers to get here in a desperate bid to keep her children alive. my car was blocked by a panicked group of women trying to get some food. please help us, this woman shouts, i am sick. but there is little help for the thousands who come here, the weak transitional federal government controls only part of the capital and has been fighting the al qaeda linked group for years. al shabab has been operating in this area for years. leaving these people trapped and two weeks to make to it the u.n. continues in neighboring kenya. they have come here to the capital in search of help. tens of thousands of somalis arrived in mogadishu just in the last few days. but despite that, this remains one of the hardest places in the world to get food aid to. this is a very dangerous country. as a foreign reporter, i
the capital, mogadishu. a warning: some of the images in this report are very disturbing. >> reporter: ahmed is eight months old and close to dying of hunger. he lies in the lap of his father, abdi. the pair have traveled for four perilous days to mogadishu from the famine zone of south somalia in what abdi knows is a desperate race against time. these one-year-old twins, avshir and nasir, have just arrived, just two of the half a million children the u.n. says are seriously malnourished. the boys' mother says she walked to the capital because there's nothing to live on outside. and she's smiling, because she is lucky to have made it this far. over a thousand infants have been brought to this emergency nutrition center since it opened just a few days ago, their mothers so busy trying to save their children's lives that there's barely time to grieve for the dead children they have left behind. this is how our journey begins-- in the only safe mode of transport u.n. aid workers have- - in the backs of armored vehicles manned by peacekeepers from burundi wielding machine guns. through the windo
, as you know, mogadishu and somali were all controlled by different colonial powers. i think the reason that some have succeeded, for example, somaliland, is because some colonials powers gave more to the locals and provided them with the opportunity to govern. whereas mogadishu it was limited. this is the only resolution to be introduced in congress that focused on in two decades at that time. i also met with president of putinland, i encourage them to ban today for the future of somali. finally i traveled in 2009 after all of the evil that had occurred during the ethiopia invasion. i met with the president, ministers, journalist, and a prominent coalition of women organizations who were very, very active at that time. these were things that we did not hear about. but that was going on inspite of the violence. as a matter of fact, i was there the day following the u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s taking down three somali pirates, and, of course, i was asked at a press conference by al jazeer was there. i made it clear that piracy is illegal. the united states would not tolerate the intrusion of the
'll take you to mogadishu, somalia, where david muir is the first correspondent on the ground, reporting on the country ace epic famine. >> announcer: live from the newseum in washington, "this week with christiane amanpour" starts right now. >>> welcome to the program. lots to get to today, but first, some news since your morning papers. we have new develops to report on the story dominate all others and that's the flurry of last-minute talks to raise the debt ceiling before the country runs out of money to pay its bills. and this morning, we're hearing there is a framework of a deal being worked on, but it's fragile. and you can see the clock ticking down to the tuesday deadline. already, we're seeing signs of mounting concern on wall street. the stock market plunged more than 500 points in the last week. a loss of $700 billion, or just over 4% of its value. but this morning, a glimmer of hope, perhaps, for the very latest i'm joined by abc chief political correspondent george stephanopoulos. george, you've been talking to all your sources. are we at the edge or pulling back from the e
. at this makeshift camp in mogadishu, the islamist rebels on not as strong here in the capital as in the south here. -- are not as strong here in the capital as in the south. here, there is fertile food, drinking water, or medicine. >> we have been displaced by a terrible drought. we need help. >> supplies needed to arrive fast and in large amounts to save the lives of hundreds of thousands of people in east africa. >> a terrible story. monica is here to talk about some corporate results. >> results from the largest commercial lender >> deutsche bank, cayman lower-than- expected. -- results from the largest commercial lender, deutsche bank, came in lower than expected. -- will chair the bank's supervisory groups. >> -- is confident they will achieve record profits. he is said to turn over the reins of the banks to his two top executives. one is head of the investment banking operations. the other is the head of the business in germany. is responsible for the retail business and he is well with thp policymakers. there is some concern about his future position as head of the bank's supervisory board.
the next few towns -- few days, and 80 tons will be going to mogadishu where it will be distributed to different feeding centers form on our children. >> the food program says the first airlift will feed three and a half thousand children for the next month. but given the scale of a problem in somalia, this is just a drop in the ocean. the drought has hit so hard in parts of the south, over one- third of all children are civilian -- severely malnourished. aid agencies say with so many children in a precarious situation there is a danger that disease could break out. in somalia, almost half the population urgently needs food aid. russians have been cut in recent months. now there is a massive -- rations have been cut in recent months. now there's a massive drive for food aid. somali ministers have complained that the food aid is moving too slowly. delicate negotiations continue between the government and al- shabab. and some question why this emergency was not prevented as this food shortage and severe drought were predicted late last year. in somalia, though, people cannot wait for
two little girls left their home in mogadishu a year ago fleeing the violence between a government and insurgent group. when the drought made life even worse, they headed here. it's not perfect. at least her children are fed and safe. at the moment, she says, we've found peace. in the city she fled, somali's capital, mogadishu, government troops have been fighting to open up aid routes. this weekend the president of the fledgling government made a show of thanking troops for gaining some fwround. but even today reports that a member of parliament was gunned down. many of the most drought-stricken region of somalia are still under rebel control. the fear is the aid just isn't getting through and the fear is by the u.n. that the famine in somalia could grow, could spread to other areas. brian, it is worth noting that 12 million people across four countries now have been severely affected by this massive drought. brian? >> thank you, kate snow, again, who has just arrived. her reporting will begin tomorrow morning on "today." we'll have more of it tomorrow night on "nbc nightly news."
flights were received in mogadishu with gratitude. >> there's quite a lot -- a total of 100 tons of this special ready to use food. 80 of it for mogadishu. >> reporter: but that's nowhere near enough. today government troops advanced on fighters from the militant group al shabab. it has blocked foreign help from getting to the neediest areas. six people were killed in a gun battle. and so the exodus continues. many heading toward kenya, walking by day, sleeping in the bushes by night. facing death or attack. at the border crossing, a somali police commander says he's doing his best to provide security. but he wishes he could provide food. this is the border between kenya and somalia, the kenyan forces over here, and the somalian forces in this direction. refugees are flowing across the border with dadaab just 60 miles over here. the problem is getting aid much further in this direction, across the border. at the refugee camp, the suffering grows. but for many of the sickest victims, treacherous journeys from distant homes, where there is no water and little food might have saved
to get to the strategic places that need it? >> well, we are focusing on mogadishu and as you look at the map, you see that refugees are going out to kenya and surrounding countries. we feel like the best place for us to be is right there in the epicenter, and 50,000 people have shown up in mogadishu in the last couple of months in very bad condition, and we are focusing our medical aid on mogadishu, itself, and four things need to happen in a famine. people need to be fed with basic food commodities and supplemental feeding for children and pregnant mothers and therapeutic feeding needs to happen in clinical settings for kids in bad shape, and general medical assistance needs to go out to the whole population. we are focusing on keeping the medical assistance in there so that we can keep the people alive. >> and when you talk about, that because the extent of this could wipe out an entire generation of people. and the people that you are talking about, the ones who are traveling and the refugees and some of them are traveling hundreds of miles on foot to get to the places where th
food and supplies into the affected areas of the horn of africa. the second flight into mogadishu arrived just today. it's also raising funds to pay for aid so far more than $250 million from donor countries and has said it needs to double that to support operations over the next six months. the program's director, josette sheeran recently returned from the region. she joins us now. welcome to you. what is your current assessment of the situation in those camps we saw, and in somalia? >> well, i was just in those camps, ask it really is an unfoiledding tragedy as people flee areas in somalia where aide workers have not had any access. about 60% of the people in somalia have been inaccessible to aid and those are the people you're seeing in the camps. many of those people have walked for weeks, sometimes up to six weeks, and many of the women i talked to reported having to leave children along the road who were too weak to make it and dying on the way to the camps. >> brown: who is affected most? is it the children like we saw? >> it's been called "the children's famine" so the par
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 112 (some duplicates have been removed)

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